We must work in tandem with intelligent machines

Posted on Posted in Artificial Intelligence

Hey my friends, this is the article 80 / 1000! For those who don’t know me, my name is Selim Chehimi and I’m an engineering student. I’ve been programming for 7 years now so you can tell that I really enjoy that. Those 7 years of programming lead me to Artificial Intelligence. My dream is to build an AI Startup so that’s the reason why I’m sharing this article with you. I hope that you’ll enjoy reading it as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it.


One of the major events in the history of Artificial Intelligence was when IBM’s supercomputer Deep Blue beat the world chess champion Gary Kasparov in 1997. Before this match, Kasparov had played against 32 of the world’s best chess playing machines in Germany and he won all the games (machines were weak). However, for Deep Blue, there was something new and he didn’t know what it was – but something was obviously different. Deep Blue seemed to be stronger, in fact, he could calculate 200 million positions per second. Now, a decent question would be to ask whether Deep Blue was intelligent or not? Well, not really – not in the way that Alan Turing (father of both AI and computer science) and other founders of computer science had hoped. Basically, Deep Blue is an Artificial Narrow Intelligence which means it can do only one specific task (in this case playing chess). As you can imagine, this is far from human intelligence (we can do a bunch of different tasks).

Nowadays, machines are demonstrating skills that they never ever had before. Soon enough, they will be drivers, doctors, teachers etc. They are getting smarter and it’s probable that they will end up exploring the spectrum of intelligence in a way that we can’t imagine. Consequently, the biggest question will be to know how humans feel about working and living with these machines. Garry Kasparov thinks that we should embrace intelligent machines. From his experience, we must face our fears if we want to get the most out of our Technology and we must conquer our fear if we want to get the best out of our Humanity. That’s the reason why he created the movement of Advanced Chess in 1988 where an elite chess player is playing with the help of a supercomputer. The first games were terrible, the players failed to combine human and machine skills effectively.

Now, it’s no longer true because every human is merging with machines day after day. In fact, we’re already some kind of cyborgs – we have more computational power in our smartphone than the US President had when we sent humans to the moon. Another decent example would be the online translation. It’s far from being perfect but with our human experience, we can adapt the result to make sense out of the translation and machines can learn from our corrections. Machines have calculations, we have the understanding. Machines have neutrality, we have passion. We must adapt and work in tandem with intelligent machines.


Thanks so much for reading, that’s the end of Article 80. Please, share it and don’t forget to follow me on social media. You can also subscribe to my newsletter below to never miss any article. Don’t hesitate to tell me what you think of this Article in the comments and stay tuned for another one tomorrow!

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